Kitchari is an ancient Ayurvedic dish which can be altered to your taste preferences (adding more spice if you prefer). It is a cleansing dish which is used to nourish and fortify the body after detoxification programs and for people who require simple foods when feeling poorly.  This dish is versatile as it can even be served as a soup also (blend the ingredients and add more water) for those who like the warmth that soups feed the soul.

Servings Prep Time Cook Time
4peopl 10 30
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
You:
Rate this recipe!
Add to My Shopping List
Added to your Shopping List
Print Recipe
Ingredients
Servings: peopl Units:
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
You:
Rate this recipe!
Add to My Shopping List
Added to your Shopping List
Print Recipe
Ingredients
Servings: peopl Units:
Method
  1. Wash the rice and Mung dahl separately in at least 2 changes of water. Add the 6 cups of water to the rice and dal and cook covered until it becomes soft, about 20 minutes.
  2. While that is cooking, prepare any vegetables. Cut them into smallish pieces. Add the vegetables to the cooked rice and dal mixture and cook 10 minutes longer.
  3. In a separate saucepan, sauté the seeds in the ghee until they pop. Then add the other spices. Stir together to release the flavors. Stir the sautéed spices into the cooked dal, rice, and vegetable mixture. Add the mineral salt and chopped fresh cilantro and serve.

About Sally James:

Sally James N.D is a Naturopathic lecturer, content health writer and naturopathic advisor, with 18 years experience working for herbal medicines companies in the areas of research, technical support and naturopathic advice.

She has a special interest in womens health seeking to provide them with advice in natural health care through supporting, informing and educating women to empower themselves through better understanding of their bodies.

Sally also runs a website called Ask a Naturopath, founded in 2008.
Ask a Naturopath provides natural health information to the wider audience via personal email consultations and over 500 pages of resources.

http://www.askanaturopath.com